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Recent News

FACULTY JOB OPPORTUNITIES

The Department of Biology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill invites applications for two faculty positions: an Assistant Professor in Plant Molecular Biology and Genomics and a Lecturer to teach courses in Ecology/Evolution and Introductory Biology. READ MORE >>


KERRY BLOOM’S PAPER APPEARS IN “ANNUAL REVIEW OF GENETICS”

Professor Kerry Bloom’s paper entitled: “Centromeric Heterochromatin: The Primordial Segregation Machine” appears in the Annual Review of Genetics. This review explores the physical properties of centromeric DNA to understand how a molecular spring is built and contributes to the fidelity of chromosome segregation. READ MORE >>


CHLOE SNIDER’S RESEARCH IS PUBLISHED IN JCB

First author Chloe Snider, (a former undergraduate student in the Kerry Bloom lab-now a graduate student at Vanderbilt University) discovered a novel role for tRNA transcription factors and modification enzymes in recruiting condensin to centromeric heterochromatin. This function is conserved from yeast to human and explains the mitotic defect in DKC1 (dyskerin), a gene defective in Dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal–Hreidarsson syndrome. The Journal of Cell Biology publication is entitled: “Dyskerin, tRNA genes, and condensin tether pericentric chromatin to the spindle axis in mitosis”.  READ MORE  >>


JEFF DANGL RECEIVES THE DANFORTH AWARD FOR PLANT SCIENCES

The Danforth Award for Plant Sciences recognizes a prominent national or international leader for outstanding achievement and service for the benefit of agriculture, food nutrition or human health. Past recipients include Nobel Laureate Norman Borlaug, World Food Prize co-winners Mary-Dell Chilton and Robb Fraley, and L’Oreal Prize winner Joanne Chory. Congratulations to this year’s recipient, Jeffery L. Dangl, who has advanced our understanding of how plants fight infection and interact with beneficial microbial communities, a key to improving agricultural productivity. His contributions include, with Jonathan Jones, the Guard Hypothesis, which proposed that plant disease-resistance proteins respond to cell damage caused by pathogen virulence effectors, rather than by direct recognition of those effectors. Dangl is a passionate advocate for the importance of plant science and a committed mentor to students and postdoctoral researchers. VIDEO LINK >>


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