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Recent News

VICTORIA BAUTCH WILL CO-CHAIR 2017 NAVBO SPONSORED MEETING

Biology Distinguished Professor & Chair Victoria Bautch was elected to co-chair the “Developmental Vascular Biology and Genetics Meeting” sponsored by NAVBO (North American Vascular Biology Organization) in 2017. Brian Black of the University of California-San Francisco is the other co-chair. “NAVBO provides a forum for vascular biologists who are either in the traditional basic science disciplines (structural/molecular biology, cell biology, physiology) or studying the pathogenesis and treatment of human disease in disciplines such as medicine, pathology, and surgery.”


VICTORIA BAUTCH APPOINTED TO MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE ADVISORY BOARD

Biology Distinguished Professor & Chair Victoria Bautch was recently appointed to the International Scientific Advisory Board for the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine in Muenster, Germany. Investigating the formation of cells, tissues and organs, the Institute’s work is dedicated to three areas – stem cell research, inflammation processes, and blood vessel growth.


ELIZABETH SHANK PAPER APPEARS IN PNAS

Biology Assistant Professor Elizabeth Shank, along with UNC School of Pharmacy colleagues Rachel Bleich (graduate student) and Albert Bowers (Assistant Professor) and others at UCSD, published a paper in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) last week entitled “Thiopeptide antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.” This paper describes how they used imaging mass spectrometry to identify the antibiotic thiocillin as an inter-bacterial signal that activates biofilm formation. They go on to show that this molecule possesses two structurally independent activities (killing and biofilm-formation), a finding that has implications for how we treat infections as well as our perception of why bacteria produce such molecules in the first place. READ MORE >>  READ THE PAPER >>


BOB GOLDSTEIN’S ARTICLE APPEARS IN “NAUTILUS”

Nautilus, a magazine on science and culture, published a very interesting article written by Biology Professor Bob Goldstein entitled: “The Thrill of Defeat”. “The story describes one of the biggest scoops in the history of science, the 1961 deciphering of DNA’s language, the genetic code. Sydney Brenner and Francis Crick, now famous as two of the 20th century’s most brilliant geneticists, worked on this problem from 1953 to 1961, only to be beaten to the punch by a little-known American biochemist. Their reaction? They were thrilled.” READ MORE >>


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