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ALAIN LAEDERACH’S LAB GETS NIH GRANT RENEWED

October 23, 2017

Congratulations to Alain Laederach’s lab for renewing their NIH grant titled “Structural and functional consequences of disease SNP’s on the transcriptome.” The lab will continue to study riboSNitches and will also be able to delve deeper into RNA structure/function relationships in translationally regulated 5’UTRs. In addition, the lab has secured two additional collaborative proposals, one with Christine Heitsch (Math Department, Georgia Tech) titled “Multimodal RNA structural motifs in Alphavirus genomes:Discovery and Validations,” and another with Nils Walter (Chemistry Department, University of Michigan) titled “Timing and coordination of the conformational rearrangements mediating splicing.” In both of these collaborative projects the lab will actively participate in both the experimental and computational aims. In fact for the Georgia Tech project, which is funded through the Math Directorate joint NSF/NIH program, the Laederach lab’s role is primarily experimental. Neighboring labs in GSB need not worry, however, as Alain’s role remains completely “dry.”

CHANIN TOLSON AND LELA LACKEY PUBLISH IN “BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL”

October 23, 2017

Congratulations to Chanin Tolson and Lela Lackey (Alain Laederach’s lab) whose paper was recently published in the Biophysical Journal. Their paper, titled “Comparative Visualization of the RNA Suboptimal Conformational Ensemble In Vivo,” describes a novel approach for visualization of RNA structure using multi-dimensional scaling techniques to better normalize the Boltzmann suboptimal ensemble of RNA structures. In practice this approach is far more robust and allows accurate interpretation of the structural consequences of the cellular environment on RNA folding.

BLOOM LAB’S PAPER IS PUBLISHED IN “MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL”

October 23, 2017

Congratulations to Kerry Bloom’s lab, whose paper has been published in Molecular Biology of the Cell. The paper is titled “Microtubule dynamics drive enhanced chromatin motion and mobilize telomeres in response to DNA damage,” and is featured as the cover article. Authors on the article include six undergrads from the lab: Timothy Barry, Raymond Barry, Brandon Friedman, Kristin Akiales, Diana Cook, and Alyssa York. 

BLOOM LAB’S PAPER APPEARS IN “NUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH”

October 23, 2017

Congratulations to the Kerry Bloom lab, whose publication in Nucleic Acids Research features three undergrads working there: Diana Cook, Maggie Bennett, and Alyssa York. The paper is titled “Enrichment of dynamic chromosomal crosslinks drive phase separation of the nucleolus”. The journal publishes the results of leading edge research into physical, chemical, biochemical and biological aspects of nucleic acids and proteins involved in nucleic acid metabolism and/or interactions.

KELSEY GRAY RECEIVES “OUTSTANDING POSTER AWARD”

October 23, 2017

Kelsey Gray (Greg Matera’s lab), a graduate student in Genetics and Molecular Biology, received an outstanding poster award for her poster titled “SCFSlmb mediates degradation of Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein” at the Department of Genetics Scientific Retreat.

EMILIE RICHARDS PUBLISHES IN “PLOS GENETICS”

October 23, 2017

Congratulations to Emilie Richards (Chris Martin’s lab) for her publication in PLOS Genetics titled “Adaptive introgression from distant Caribbean islands contributed to the diversification of a microendemic adaptive radiation of trophic specialist pupfishes.” Emilie demonstrates that rare introgression of adaptive alleles linked to novel craniofacial phenotypes may be necessary for adaptive radiation in addition to the traditional paradigm of ecological opportunity. Intriguingly, narrowly endemic species are assembled from different pots of genetic variation over a very large range.

DANGL LAB’S PAPER APPEARS IN “PNAS”

October 23, 2017

Farid El Kasmi and Eui Hwan Chung of the Jeff Dangl labpublished “Signaling from the plasma-membrane localized plant immune receptor RPM1 requires self-association of the full-length protein” in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Co-authors include current post docs Ryan Anderson and Li Wan, former doctoral student Tim Eitas and former post-doc Zhiyong Gao. This work explores the relationship between protein structure and function of a representative plant resistance NLR protein.